Have you ever gotten that feeling when you’re listening to a great song that makes all of the hairs on your arm tingle? Experiencing goosebumps or a lump in the throat while listening to a song is a unique and rare experience.

A recent study was conducted by former undergraduate Harvard student Matthew Sachs that focused on individuals who get chills from listening to music.

Read on to find out what the results from the study were and what they mean.

The research that Sachs conducted featured 20 students, and 10 of those students admitted to experiencing some sort of feelings during music, and the other 10 felt nothing. Sachs had each student take a brain scan during the experiment.

The results from the brain scan showed that the students who managed to make an emotional connection to the music they were listening to actually have a different brain structure than the students who did not.

The research showed that they have a denser volume of fibers that connect their auditory cortex and areas that process emotions, which is the reason that they connect with the music better. This means that if you get chills from music, you’re more likely to have deeper and stronger emotions.

These sensations can also be associated with certain memories that are linked to a certain song.

Sachs believes that music could one day be a reliable tool to use for dealing with depression,

“Depression causes an inability to experience pleasure of everyday things. You could use music with a therapist to explore feelings.”

Now that you know what the potential reason between emotions and music are, read on to find out what other benefits to listening to music are.

Eases Stress and Anxiety: Those drives home where you’re stuck in traffic, or when you’re trying to build furniture that has awful instructions can be stressful and frustrating.

But if you turn on some tunes and start jamming out, you may find yourself ignoring all the stress and frustration that comes with these scenarios.

Gives You Energy: Those long days at work or at school can be very dreadful. Starring at a computer screen or a book for hours on end can really drain the body.

But listening to music has a way of tricking the brain into thinking that you have more energy than you actually do.

Changes Your Heartbeat: If you constantly have high blood pressure or your heartbeat is beating at a rapid pace, you may want to try listening to soothing music to calm you down.

A 2009 study found that music triggered changes in the mind that could reduce high blood pressure and heart rate depending on the song you’re listening to.

Bursts of Creativity: Most people already blast music to help them get through a grueling project help boost their creative mind. But research has shown that keeping the volume at a moderate level is the best way to keep us inspired.

Studies have also shown that the middle section of the volume actually promotes abstract processing in the brain, thus leading to more creativity.

Reduce Physical Pain: If you find yourself dealing with a massive headache or lower back pain, try turning on the radio or your Ipod.

Studies have shown that channeling your mind to a song can ease the harsh pressure on your body as the music fills your ears.

Source: https://goodthingstoknow.co

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Have you ever gotten that feeling when you’re listening to a great song that makes all of the hairs on your arm tingle? Experiencing goosebumps or a lump in the throat while listening to a song is a unique and rare experience. A recent study was conducted by former undergraduate...