Most people who are on Paleo diet are already experts on coconut and almond flour. However, few of them are familiar with other options, such as chestnut, cassava, and tiger-nut flour. Even though flours shouldn’t be routinely used when on Paleo diet, variety is always important! Below, you have a list of some of the most common flours and their potential.

  1. Coconut Flour

Coconut flour is obtained by pressing the coconut milk and grounding the coconut meat afterward. It is very high in inulin fiber, which makes it great at absorbing liquids. Most recipes which involve coconut flour actually use very little amounts of it and high amount of moisture, such as eggs.  The aforementioned fiber is highly fermentable and soluble, which means that it doesn’t go well with people having IBS, SIBO or FODMAP issues. Coconut flour has slightly sweet flavor and it is highly versatile. It can be used for making cakes, pizza crust, muffins, brownies and more. In addition, you can even use it as a coating for things like chicken fingers.

  1. Almond Flour

Almond flour is usually made with ground up blanched almonds and it is the most delicious Paleo flour. It is highly versatile too, and it can be used to make waffles, cakes, muffins, and many other baked goods. When compared to coconut flour, almonds are lower in carbs but higher in protein. Still, you have to watch your almond flour intake, as its almonds are high in omega-6 PUFAs.  Almond flour should be one of your main staples when eating Paleo diet, as this flour is gluten-free, low in carbohydrates, high in fiber and a high source of protein.

  1. Chestnut Flour

When compared to other nuts, chestnuts are less fatty and much starchier. Even though chestnut flour can replace almond flour in most recipes, note that it has a very strong flavor. The content for chestnuts is extremely low! There is about 47 mg/100 g of phytic acid in chestnuts while almonds have 1,280 mg/100 g and 760mg/100 g in walnuts. Speaking of other nutrients, chestnuts contain 17% potassium, 25% B6, 25% copper, 43% vitamin C, and 59% manganese. Moreover, 100 grams of chestnuts contain 53 grams of cars, 5 of which are from fiber.

  1. Cassava Flour

Cassava is commonly used across Latin America, Asia, and Africa. If you have never heard about cassava flour, you might have about tapioca flour, which is obtained from the cassava plant. When compared to wheat flour, cassava is smoother and cleaner, but very similar in texture. You can use cassava flour for baked goods or boil and mash the root like potatoes.

Speaking of its nutritional value, cassava contains about 78 grams per cup with about 4 grams of fiber. Make sure you always boil the root prior eating it, as it can cause cyanide poisoning if eater raw. It is also important to mention that some people are allergic to the plant and the American Cancer Society warns that people with a latex rubber allergy might be at higher risk.

  1. Tigernut Flour

Even though the name itself suggests that tiger-nut is a type of nut, it is actually a root vegetable.  This flour is gluten-free and it has a pleasing flavor. Speaking of nutritional value, tigerut flour is high in monounsaturated fats and fiber. In fact, 1 ounce of tiger-nuts has 10 grams of fiber and 19 grams of carbs. Tigernut flour has recently gained popularity among Paleo eaters and its versatility is one of the reasons for it. Namely, it is ideal for cooking, baking, as a topping for desserts, and for adding to drinks such as smoothies.

Source: http://www.faithpanda.com



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Most people who are on Paleo diet are already experts on coconut and almond flour. However, few of them are familiar with other options, such as chestnut, cassava, and tiger-nut flour. Even though flours shouldn’t be routinely used when on Paleo diet, variety is always important! Below, you have...